January 28, 2021

The Best Birth Control Method For You: 6 Of The Most Popular Explored

Rosalie Boyle

In this day and age, women aren’t expected to remain chaste until marriage. Accordingly, women all over the world can choose from more than one birth control method. For the time in your life when you aren’t looking to have a baby, you can add an extra layer of protection besides your standard condom.  So, look no further to find out about the most popular types of birth control to help you decide which is best for you.

Birth Control Methods

“Let’s Talk About Sex, Baby”

Let’s not be bashful, right?  Salt-N-Pepa has given their permission! 

As a woman, when you become sexually active, you want to protect yourself.  No one wants to have to deal with an STD.  Rashes, warts, or even a life-threatening disease…no, thank you!  And babies are adorable, and a miracle and all that, but it’s usually preferable to be ready and planning for it.

There’s obviously nothing wrong with saving yourself for marriage.  But even after you’re married, you may not be ready to have a baby right away.  

It’s your right as a modern woman to inform yourself.   It’s the best and only way to take control of your own body.

Although the pill often dominates the contraceptive conversation, there are some other options available.  

It’s clearly a conversation that should be happening.  There are millions of women worldwide who decide to use a form of birth control.  According to the Contraceptive Use By Method data booklet by the United Nations:

Percent of women who use birth control

Amongst the women surveyed, 1.1 billion women felt they needed birth control.  Moreover, considering 922 million of those women use a method of birth control, it’s obviously an important subject.

In this article, you’ll learn more about six of the most popular birth control methods on the market.  Whether it be an IUD, an implant, the pill, the patch, the ring, or the injection, they’re all great ways to prevent pregnancy.  Once you know more about them, depending on your lifestyle and your needs you’ll be able to choose the right method for you.

Categories of Birth Control 

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are 5 different categories of birth control methods:

  • Barrier Methods physically stop the sperm from fertilizing the egg. Examples include a condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, etc. 
  • Fertility Awareness mark on a calendar the days of the month when you are fertile and, therefore, can get pregnant. The days tend de be based on tracking basal body temperature (temperature when you’re fully at rest) and your cervical mucus.
  • Short-Acting Hormonal Methods require you to use or change on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. In this category, you’ll find the pill, patch, injection, and ring. 
  • Long-Acting Hormonal Methods are the hormonal methods that last for a longer time. Depending on the birth control method, this can oscillate between 3 and 10 years. The IUD and the implant are both LARCs (Long-Acting Reversible Contraception).
  • Sterilization is a permanent type of contraception. It is tubal ligation for a woman and a vasectomy for a man.
  • Emergency Contraception is used in an emergency situation to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. The most well-known examples are Plan B and the Morning After Pill. According to the HealthPartners Blog, you’ll want to take whichever one you choose ASAP for it to be more effective.   

Depending on where you’re from or where you live, the most popular birth control method can vary.  As you can see from the same data booklet by the UN,

Contraception Methods by Region

All of the methods are very effective, but the ones that require less intervention tend to be more consistently effective.  Everyone is liable to forget to take a pill or change a patch every once in a while.  

Although all of the categories prevent pregnancy, the same can’t be said about STDs.  The only products that will protect you from STDs are ones belonging to the barrier category.  They lower your chances of getting diseases like HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and herpes.  Ideally, you’d use a barrier method combined with another form of birth control to give you extra protection.

Except for sterilization, all of the methods are reversible.  Even the LARCs allow you to change your mind at any point.  

If you need help to discover which method could work best for you, consult a gynecologist

Long-Term Hormonal Birth Control Methods 

The products in this category are often thought of as the most convenient and foolproof methods on the market.  They’re very efficacious because they require minimal upkeep and last for a number of years, depending on the device.  

Birth Control Implant

Birth Control Method #1: Not Your Everyday Implant

The implant is a short, thin, stick-shaped contraceptive that a doctor or nurse inserts in your upper arm.  The insertion process is fast and relatively painless since the doctor numbs your arm first.  The area around the insertion point can feel sensitive, swell, and/or look bruised for one or two weeks after.  

It contains the progestin hormone, which thickens the mucus in your cervix.  This stops the sperm from getting to your egg and can prevent an egg from leaving your ovaries.  

It lasts for 5 years and is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy since it’s implanted in your arm.

If you decide you want to get pregnant, your doctor can easily remove it.  It can take your body a couple of months to go back to the way it was before you had the implant.  But you can get pregnant soon after you remove it.  So, if you don’t want to get pregnant, make sure you use another birth control method.  

Since it doesn’t contain estrogen, it’s perfectly safe to use while you are breastfeeding.

Side Effects

The following are all possible but often will go away after a few months once your body is used to the implant.

Positive:

  • Lessen the effect of painful or heavy periods
  • Make your period lighter
  • Ease cramps and/or PMS

Negative:

  • Spotting in the first 6-12 months
  • Headaches
  • Breast Pain
  • Nausea
  • Weight gain (due to water retention, but is temporary)
  • Ovarian cysts (a growth on your ovaries, which are usually benign)

Watch Out For

These are rare, but consult your physician if you suffer from any of the following: 

  • Arm pain lasting more than a few days
  • Scarring at the injection site 
  • An infection at the injection site stubborn enough to need medication 
  • Bleeding, pus, discoloration, or pain at the injection site
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin
  • Heavier or longer than normal vaginal bleeding
  • Implant moves

IUD Birth Control

Birth Control Method #2: IUD

The Intrauterine Device, or IUD, is a small T-shaped device that a doctor or nurse inserts into your uterus.  There are two types: hormonal and copper.  Both are made of flexible plastic, but the copper IUD contains no hormones and instead is wrapped in copper wire.  Both change the way sperm move, so they’re unable to reach the egg.  They are birth control methods that are 99% effective.

The Hormonal IUD contains progestin, which thickens the cervical mucus, similar to the implant birth control method.  Depending on the brand, it can last anywhere from 3 to 7 years.

The Copper IUD relies on the properties of copper, which actually repels sperm.  If you have a copper allergy, you should obviously avoid this type of IUD.  Depending on the brand, it can last anywhere from 10 to 12 years.  

An added benefit lies in its ability to act as emergency contraception.  If the Copper IUD is inserted within 120 hours (5 days) of unprotected sex, it’s 99.9% effective in preventing pregnancy.  But there is one unpopular disadvantage to the Copper IUD.  Unlike the Hormonal IUD, it can make periods heavier with more cramping.  But this often goes away over time.

After your doctor puts in your IUD, it’s common to experience cramping and/or pain, and even dizziness.  Therefore, you’d be better off having someone go with you to your appointment just in case you need help getting home.  Some people are fine soon after the insertion, while others experience some discomfort for the rest of the day.  So, this would be the perfect opportunity to take a personal day.

The IUD has a thin string attached to the bottom that extends to the top of your vagina. Many people don’t notice it. But NEVER pull on it, or your IUD can be pulled out of place. Using a menstrual cup is incompatible with having an IUD because it can also make it move. If your IUD falls out or you accidentally pull it out, see a gynecologist right away.

The IUD can be removed easily by your doctor or a nurse, but your period will go back to behaving how it did before you had the IUD.  Soon after removing it, you should be able to get pregnant.  It’s safe to have an IUD while breastfeeding.

It is unlikely to get pregnant while you have an IUD.  But if you do, remove your IUD immediately.  Otherwise, it could cause an ectopic pregnancy (the fertilized egg is in the fallopian tube instead of your womb) and other health problems.

Side Effects

The following are all possible but often will go away after a few months once your body is used to the IUD.

Hormonal IUD:

  • Can lessen the effect of painful or heavy periods
  • Can make your period lighter or make it stop altogether 
  • Ease cramps and/or PMS
  • Spotting between periods
  • Irregular periods

Copper IUD:

  • Can make periods heavier with more cramps (especially in the first 3-6 months)
  • Irregular periods
  • Longer periods

Watch Out For

These are rare, but consult your physician if you suffer from any of the following: 

  • Keep an eye on the length of the string
  • Can feel the plastic bottom of the IUD
  • If you think you’re pregnant 
  • Bad cramps, pain, or soreness in the lower belly or stomach
  • Experience pain or bleeding during sex
  • Feel a sudden fever, chills, or trouble breathing
  • Unusual vaginal discharge
  • Heavier vaginal bleeding

Short-Term Hormonal Birth Control Methods 

These products are usually cheaper in the short term but have a higher risk for human error.  If you forget to get a new shot, change your ring or patch, or take your pill on time, it could adversely affect your ability to prevent pregnancy.  

For those of you who are methodically using a calendar and are super organized, this is for you.  But, for the more free-flowing types, pay extra attention.  Use a scheduling app to make sure you remember. 

Injection Birth Control Methods

Birth Control Method #3: Injection, Needle-Phobes Need Not Apply!

The birth control injection is a safe and convenient shot containing the progestin hormone.  If we lived in a world where no one ever forgot to do something, it would be 99% effective.  Since that’s not the case, the shot is 94% effective.

In most cases, it’s administered by a doctor or nurse every 3 months.  But it’s possible to do it yourself at home if you consult with your gynecologist.  It’s pivotal that you get the shot every 12-13 weeks, so make sure you stay on top of your scheduling.  

Let’s say you forget to take your next shot, and you’re 2 or more weeks late.  Your doctor will probably advise you to take a pregnancy test if you’ve had unprotected sex in the previous 5 days.  And in the worst-case scenario, you may need to use an emergency contraceptive.

If you get your first shot within the first week after the start of your period, you’re protected from pregnancy right away.  The same is true within 7 days after a miscarriage or abortion or 3 weeks after having a baby.  If you get the shot at any other time, you should use an additional birth control method for the first week after getting the shot. 

Some women may experience a temporary decrease in bone density due to the injection.  Studies have shown that this can last for the first couple of years but should then level out.  To offset this, make sure to get regular exercise and include extra calcium in your diet. (Remember that if you need help structuring a diet, check out our blog article on healthy diet plans.)

If you decide to stop the injection, your period will go back to how it was before you started taking the shot.  In some cases, you may encounter some difficulty getting pregnant for up to 10 months.  So, plan accordingly.

Don’t use this birth control method if you’ve had breast cancer.

Side Effects

The following are all possible but often will go away after a few months once your body is used to the injection.

Positive:

  • Lessen the effect of painful or heavy periods
  • Make your period lighter or go away altogether
  • Ease cramps and/or PMS
  • Can protect you from health conditions including uterine cancer (find out what else you can do to prevent cancer here) and anemia

Negative:

  • Spotting 
  • Bleeding more days than usual
  • Headaches
  • Breast Pain
  • Nausea
  • Weight gain (due to water retention, but is temporary)
  • Depression
  • Bruising at the injection site

Watch Out For

These are rare, but consult your physician if you suffer from any of the following: 

  • Severe depression
  • Migraine with an aura (seeing bright, flashing, or zigzags of light, or blind spots)  
  • Pus, pain, or bleeding for a number of days at the injection site 
  • Bleeding, pus, discoloration, or pain at the injection site
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin
  • Heavier or longer than normal vaginal bleeding

Contraceptive Ring

Birth Control Method #4: You Better Put a Ring On It

The birth control ring is small and flexible, which you insert in your vagina.  It contains both estrogen and progestin that you absorb through the vaginal lining.  These hormones protect you from pregnancy by halting ovulation and blocking the sperm.  The ring is 91% effective (unless you use it flawlessly, and then it’s 99%).

If you put your ring in during the first 5 days of your period, it will protect you from pregnancy right away.  If you initiate any other time, it must be in your vagina for 7 days before it’s effective at preventing pregnancy.

Since this birth control method contains estrogen, don’t smoke if you’re over 35 years old.  Also, according to planned parenthood, don’t use the ring if you’ve had or have:

  • Blood clots or an inherited blood-clotting disorder
  • Vein inflammation
  • Breast cancer
  • Heart attack, stroke, angina, or severe heart problems
  • Migraine headaches with aura
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Bad diabetes
  • Liver disease

Your period will go back to how it was before the ring if you choose to stop using it.  And if it cleared up any acne, there’s a chance it could come back.  You could get pregnant immediately after eliminating the ring.

How to Use the Ring Birth Control Method According to Your Needs

Regardless of the system you choose, the better you are about changing your ring, the better it will protect you.  The main factors that make this birth control method not behave come down to use.  This refers to not changing it on time or not using it for more than 2 days when you should be wearing it.

 

Take note of the following medications and conditions because they can make the ring not work as well:

  • Antibiotics Rifampin, Rifampicin, or Rifamate (prevent tuberculosis and meningitis)
  • Griseofulvin (antifungal medication)
  • Certain HIV medicines
  • Certain anti-seizure medicines (which and also treat psychiatric disorders)
  • St. John’s Wort (a herbal, natural remedy for depression)

 

Even if you use it correctly, there’s a very slight chance you could still get pregnant.  Therefore, combine this birth control method with another contraceptive.

Store your birth control rings at room temperature out of direct sunlight for up to 4 months.  The rings that you’ll use after 4 months should be kept in the refrigerator.

To put it in, squeeze the ring together and gently push it inside of your vagina.  To remove it, hook your finger around it and gently pull it out.  The best way to dispose of it is to wrap it in toilet paper and throw it in the garbage.

You have the choice of getting or not getting your period while using the ring.

To Have a Period 

Wear the ring for either 3, 4, or 5 weeks.  Take it out and leave it out for 1 week, which is when you’ll have your period.  Then put in a new ring.  Always have the day that you take out your old birth control ring and put a new one in, be the same day of the week.  

To Skip Your Period 

Using a short-term birth control method to skip your period is perfectly safe.  According to the Nurx blog, this option will save you from menstrual symptoms because of the drop in hormones.  Just expect some spotting in the beginning while your body is getting used to it.

There are two methods:

  1. Pick a day of the month, put in a new ring on that day every month.
  2. Wear the ring for 3, 4, or 5 weeks.  Take out your ring and put in a new one (always on the same day of the week).

Side Effects

The following are all possible but often go away after a few months once your body is used to the ring.

Positive:

  • Lessen the effect of painful, intense, or irregular periods
  • Make your period lighter 
  • Can use it to skip your period
  • Ease cramps and/or PMS
  • Can prevent or help acne
  • Can protect you from health conditions including anemia, bone thinning, ovarian and breast cysts, ovarian infections, endometrial and ovarian cancer, ectopic pregnancy

Negative:

  • Spotting 
  • Bleeding more days than usual
  • Headaches
  • Breast Pain
  • Vaginal wetness
  • Changes in your period (make it early or late)

Negative Due to Estrogen:

  • Increase the risk of some health issues: heart attack, stroke, blood clots, liver tumors, and death in the rarest of cases

Watch Out For

These are rare, but consult your physician if you suffer from any of the following: 

  • Sudden back or jaw pain with nausea
  • Sweating
  • Trouble breathing
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Achy legs
  • Severe stomach pain
  • Bad and frequent headaches or a migraine with an aura (seeing bright, flashing, or zigzags of light, or blind spots)  
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin

Birth Control Patch

Birth Control Method #5: Patch Up!

The patch is a birth control method containing estrogen and progestin.  It is absorbed through the skin either on your upper arm, back, butt, or belly.  These hormones protect you from pregnancy by stopping ovulation and blocking the sperm.  The patch is 91% effective (unless you use it with no mistakes, and then it’s 99%).

If you put your patch on during the first 5 days after your period starts, it will protect you from pregnancy right away.  If you start it at any other time, you have to use it for 7 days to get the same effect.

Like the ring, since the birth control patch contains estrogen, don’t smoke if you’re over 35 years old.  Also, according to planned parenthood, don’t use the ring if you’ve had or have:

  • Blood clots or an inherited blood-clotting disorder
  • Vein inflammation
  • Breast cancer
  • Heart attack, stroke, angina, or severe heart problems
  • Migraine headaches with aura
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Bad diabetes
  • Liver disease

If you stop using the patch, your period will go back to how it was before.  When it helps with skin issues, there’s a chance those could come back.  In the case you decide you want to get pregnant, you should be able to right after stopping.

Using the Patch Birth Control Method Based on Your Lifestyle

Whether you want to get your period or not, like with the ring, diligence is your friend.  So, stay on top of changing it.  The main reasons that would interfere with its proper function are if you don’t change your patch or it falls off. 

 

The following medications could also make the patch not work as well:

  • Antibiotics Rifampin, Rifampicin, or Rifamate (prevent tuberculosis and meningitis)
  • Griseofulvin (an antifungal medicine)
  • Certain HIV medicines
  • Certain anti-seizure medicines (which and also treat psychiatric disorders)
  • St. John’s Wort (a herbal, natural remedy for depression)

 

Even if you’re 100% on top of it, there’s a very slight chance you could still get pregnant using the patch.  So, it’s advisable to combine it with another contraceptive (like condoms).

Store your birth control patch at room temperature, not in the refrigerator or freezer, and away from direct sunlight.  Keep it in its sealed package until you’re just about to put it on.

Once you’ve chosen where you’re going to put the patch, clean the area first and thoroughly dry it.  Place the patch on, trying not to touch the sticky underside with your fingers.  Press on top for 10 seconds or so, and that’s it!  

Make sure you remember not to use anything on your skin in the area that could affect its ability to stay stuck.  So, no lotions, makeup, etc.  But don’t worry, you can still go swimming and work up a sweat.

So using the patch, do you want to get your period or skip it altogether?

To Have a Period 

If you want to have a regular period, remember that you wear each patch for 1 week.  So, wear 3 patches in a row, each for 1 week.  On the 4th week, don’t wear one because that’s when you will get your period.  On the first day of the 5th week, put on a new patch.  You may still be bleeding, but that’s normal.    

To Skip Your Period 

Put a new patch on at the start of each week.  With this option, you will always be wearing a patch.  You may experience bleeding or spotting for the first 6 months, but then your body will acclimate.  It is up to you whether you want to skip all of your periods or just one.

Side Effects

The following are all possible but often go away after a few months once your body is used to the patch.

Positive:

  • Lessen the effect of painful, intense, or irregular periods
  • Make your period lighter 
  • Can use it to skip your period
  • Ease cramps and/or PMS
  • Can prevent or help acne
  • Can protect you from health conditions including anemia, bone thinning, ovarian and breast cysts, ovarian, uterine, or fallopian tube infections, endometrial and ovarian cancer, ectopic pregnancy

Negative:

  • Spotting 
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Breast Pain
  • Vaginal wetness
  • Changes in your period (make it early or late)
  • Sore skin where the patch is

Negative Caused by the Presence of Estrogen:

  • Increase the risk of some health issues: heart attack, stroke, blood clots, liver tumors, and death in the rarest of cases

Watch Out For

These are rare, but consult your physician if you suffer from any of the following: 

  • Sudden back or jaw pain with nausea
  • Sweating
  • Trouble breathing
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Achy legs
  • Severe stomach pain
  • Bad and frequent headaches or a migraine with an aura (seeing bright, flashing, or zigzags of light, or blind spots)  
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin

Pill Birth Control Methods

Birth Control Method #6: It’s Not Such a Hard Pill to Swallow

When talking about contraception, people often picture those little packets of pills.  So, the pill could be considered the most ubiquitous birth control method.  This method consists of taking 1 pill every day and is 91% effective (unless you use it perfectly with no slip-ups, and then it’s 99%).

There are two different types: Combination Pills, or COCs, (which contains estrogen and progestin) and Progestin-Only Pills, or Mini pills.  

With COCs, if you start them during the first 5 days after your period starts, it will protect you from pregnancy right away.  If starting at any other time, you have to take the pill for 7 days to be protected.  With Mini pills, you can start any day of the month and be protected after 2 days.

Like the patch and the ring, since COCs contain estrogen, don’t smoke if you’re over 35 years old.  Also, according to planned parenthood, don’t use the combination pill if you’ve had or have:

  • Blood clots or an inherited blood-clotting disorder
  • Vein inflammation
  • Breast cancer
  • Heart attack, stroke, angina, or severe heart problems
  • Migraine headaches with aura
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Bad diabetes
  • Liver disease

If you stop using the pill, your period will go back to how it was before you started using them. When it cleared up your acne, there’s a chance that could be reversed.  In the case that you decide you want to get pregnant, you should be able to right after stopping.

User’s Manual: The Pill Edition

The standard for all the products in the short-term hormonal birth control method category is the same.  You may decide you don’t want to have your period every month.  But what’s most important is following the guidelines, taking your pill at the right times.  

 

The following medications could also interfere with the pill, decreasing its effect:

  • Antibiotics Rifampin, Rifampicin, or Rifamate (prevent tuberculosis and meningitis)
  • Griseofulvin (an antifungal medicine)
  • Certain HIV medicines
  • Certain anti-seizure medicines (which and also treat psychiatric disorders)
  • St. John’s Wort (a herbal, natural remedy for depression)
Combination Pills 

This category tends to be more common.  The bottom line is you take 1 pill a day, and you’ll be protected from pregnancy.  It’s a good idea to take your pill at the same time every day to help you remember, but it’s not necessary for COCs to function properly.

To use them follow these guidelines:

  • For 28-pill packs, take 1 pill every day, starting a new pack on the 29th day.  The last 7 pills are “placebo” pills and do not contain any hormones.  This is the time you would get your period.  Sometimes the placebo pill can contain supplements, such as iron.  
  • For 21-pill packs, take 1 pill for 21 days, then don’t take any pill for 7 days.  During those 7 days, you will get your period.  Then start a new pack on the 29th day.
  • For 91-pill packs, take 1 pill every day, starting a new pack on the 92nd day. For 84 days you’ll be taking hormone pills, and the last 7 days will be “placebos”.  The last 7 days is when you’ll have your period.  

To skip your period, forgo the “placebo” pills and directly start a new pack of pills.

Progestin-only Pills 

The main caveat with this type of pill is that you always have to take it within the same 3-hour window.  For the most part, progestin-only pills come in packs of 28 pills.  Count on having your period during the last 7 days (if you get it).  You take all of the pills in the pack and then start a new one. 

If you want to skip your period, look for a brand that has you get your period fewer times a year.  Otherwise, just skip the last week of pills in your 28-pack and instead, immediately start a new one.

Side Effects

The following are all possible but often go away after a few months once your body is used to the pill.

Positive:

  • Lessen the effect of painful, intense, or irregular periods
  • Can make your period lighter 
  • Can use them to skip your period
  • Ease cramps and/or PMS
  • Can prevent or help acne
  • Can protect you from health conditions including anemia, bone thinning, ovarian and breast cysts, ovarian, uterine, or fallopian tube infections, endometrial and ovarian cancer, ectopic pregnancy

Negative:

  • Spotting 
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Breast Pain
  • Changes in your period (make it early or late)

Negative of Combination Pills (because of the estrogen in them):

  • Increase the risk of some health issues: heart attack, stroke, blood clots, liver tumors, and death in the rarest of cases

Watch Out For

These are rare, but consult your physician if you suffer from any of the following: 

  • Sudden back or jaw pain with nausea
  • Sweating
  • Trouble breathing
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Achy legs
  • Severe stomach pain
  • Bad and frequent headaches or a migraine with an aura (seeing bright, flashing, or zigzags of light, or blind spots)  
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin

Highlights, In Case You Missed Them

To see the major takeaways, comparing the different birth control methods consult the following diagram:

If you have any other questions regarding birth control, check out the TripMedic interview with OB-GYN Dr. Maria De Pedro Cárdenas.  Here is her explanation of how birth control works:

You can find it on YouTube, clicking here.  

Birth Control Method Frequently Asked Questions and Answers 

Q: If you have or have had breast cancer, can you use birth control?

A: It’s best to avoid short and long-term acting hormonal methods if you’ve had breast cancer.  There’s evidence that shows that introducing these hormones can increase your risk of getting cancer again.

Q: Why can’t you use a birth control method with estrogen in it while breastfeeding?

A: According to Medical News Today, in some women, estrogen can cause your milk supply to decrease or completely dry up.  This happens more often in breastfeeding an older baby or when a woman is already dealing with milk supply issues.  

Q: Can anyone get an IUD?

A: According to Planned Parenthood, you shouldn’t get an IUD if you have an STD or pelvic infection, breast cancer, untreated cervical or uterine cancer, have had an abortion in the past 3 months, or if you could be pregnant.

Q: What should you do if you forget to take one of your birth control pills?

A: For the progestin-only pill if you’re still within your 3-hour window, just take it immediately.  If you’re more than 3 hours late, take the pill ASAP even if you will then take 2 pills in 1 day.  For the COC, take the pill the next day along with your pill for that day if you missed a dose.

Conclusion

The best birth control method for you is going to depend on a variety of factors.  Now you at least are informed about the most common types of contraception on the market.  So, depending on your needs and lifestyle, one method will be the best fit for you.  Consider how good your memory is, your timeline for pregnancy, what’s best for you and your partner, etc.  Take your time, think about your options, and always remember to talk to your gynecologist if you need another opinion.

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